Juvenile Delinquency: A Descriptive Study of Recidivism Among 838 Cases of Boys With No Previous Records Who Were Reported to the Bronx Units of the Youth Investigation Bureau of the New York City Police Department During 1963 and Whose Cases Were Closed "No Other Services Indicated"

Wallace Joseph Ward, Fordham University

Abstract

In our society much attention has been directed toward the problem of juvenile delinquency. Federal, State, and local agencies have broadened their horizons and expanded their roles in an attempt to effectively cope with this problem. The amount of publicity given juvenile delinquency has caused many citizens in our country to believe that this problem is one of recent origin. But while the problem of delinquency has reached critical proportion in our nation, it is by no means a product of modern society. Recognition was given to the problem of delinquency by Roman Law, which divided the young into three categories. The child under the age of seven was not held responsible for his acts; children from the age of seven to the age of puberty were lightly punished, and adults under the age of twenty-five were given certain considerations which depended on their age. The Code Napoléon, which was copies from Roman Law, placed limited responsibility on children under sixteen years of age. English law, however, held that a child over the age of seven could be guilty of a felony. "And in colonial America the criminal code of the province of East Jersey, adopted in 1688, could decree that a child convicted of assaulting or cursing his parents or of persistent disobedience or stubborne as should be hanged.

Subject Area

Criminology

Recommended Citation

Ward, Wallace Joseph, "Juvenile Delinquency: A Descriptive Study of Recidivism Among 838 Cases of Boys With No Previous Records Who Were Reported to the Bronx Units of the Youth Investigation Bureau of the New York City Police Department During 1963 and Whose Cases Were Closed "No Other Services Indicated"" (1965). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI30308747.
https://research.library.fordham.edu/dissertations/AAI30308747

Share

COinS